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StrongHearts Native Helpline Will Continue to Offer Services During COVID-19 Pandemic

StrongHearts Native Helpline acknowledges that this is a very difficult time for all Native people. We are very concerned about those most vulnerable including those who may be in unhealthy or abusive relationships; therefore, we will continue to operate and offer our services as long as possible.

At the StrongHearts office, we are taking the directed social distancing protocols very seriously. As such, callers may experience longer call wait times. Callers may press one at any time to be transferred to The National Domestic Violence Hotline, a non-Native Hotline. The Hotline is also responding to the directed protocols so callers may experience extended call wait times.

Please note that this website is not equipped to offer support services. Also, our social media accounts are not equipped to offer support services. If you need support, please call 1-844-762-8483 to speak with a trained advocate.

We hope this situation is temporary. Again, we will continue to operate and offer our services daily from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. Central Standard Time. We apologize for any disruptions in service and thank all of our Native communities for their patience.

We are here. We are ready to listen. 

Our Services

Image of purple telephoneThe StrongHearts Native Helpline (1-844-762-8483) is a culturally-appropriate domestic violence and dating violence helpline for Native Americans, available every day from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. CT. StrongHearts advocates offer the following services at no cost:

  • peer support and advocacy
  • information and education about domestic violence and dating violence
  • personalized safety planning
  • crisis intervention
  • referrals to Native or Tribal-based domestic violence service providers

Now Hiring

StrongHearts Native Helpline is seeking qualified applicants for several positions. Competitive pay, generous vacation package, 100% employer-paid health insurance including vision and dental available after the first 60 days, and retirement plan available after one year. 

Open Positions

If you click on the titles above and have issues, try right-clicking.

How to Apply

To apply, please submit all three required items below to: [email protected].

  1. Completed application form
  2. Resume
  3. A letter of interest with the position title in the subject line

About StrongHearts

Image of StrongHearts logo

American Indian and Alaska Native women suffer some of the highest rates of violence and murder in the United States, a crisis that has diminished the honored status of women and safety in tribal communities. In spite of the high rates of violence experienced by AI/AN persons, only a small percentage reached out for assistance to The Hotline at the National Domestic Violence Hotline.

In 2012, The Hotline began discussing this issue with staff from the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center (NIWRC) a Native-led nonprofit organization dedicated to ending violence against Native women and children. Together, they developed a program concept for a Native hotline developed by and run by Native advocates to support tribal communities across the United States. With input from tribal leaders, a Native women’s council, domestic violence experts, and the Family Violence Prevention and Services Program, the two organizations began laying the groundwork to develop a Native-centered hotline staffed by advocates with a strong understanding of Native cultures, as well as issues of tribal sovereignty and law.

Their vision became a reality with the creation of the StrongHearts Native Helpline (StrongHearts) in March 2017, made possible by support from the Administration on Children, Youth and Families, Family and Youth Services Bureau, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and Verizon. StrongHearts is a culturally-appropriate, anonymous, confidential service dedicated to serving Native American survivors of domestic violence and concerned family members and friends. By dialing 1-844-7NATIVE (1-844-762-8483), available nationwide daily from 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. CST, callers can connect at no cost one-on-one with knowledgeable StrongHearts advocates who can provide lifesaving tools and immediate support to enable survivors to find safety and live lives free of abuse.

StrongHearts is a partnered effort, combining the technology and infrastructure of The Hotline with NIWRC’s expertise and community connections, as well as the trust of Native advocacy groups. StrongHearts staff serve on the NIWRC team.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is StrongHearts Native Helpline?

We are a culturally appropriate domestic violence helpline for Native Americans. 

What does that mean?

Culturally appropriate for Native Americans means we are happy to help anyone, but we are built by Natives for Natives. Our advocates are trained specifically to meet the needs of Native American victim-survivors. A domestic violence helpline means our advocates are trained to help anyone impacted by domestic and dating violence. That could be a victim-survivor, a friend, family, or community member. 

Also we are completely free, confidential, and anonymous.

 

What can you do for me?

Our advocates are here to support callers through any part of an abusive relationship. They are highly trained to provide culturally-specific peer support, domestic violence and healthy relationship education, safety planning, and help finding direct services in the caller’s area, and of course, to listen.

Our advocates serve many different /callers. In addition to helping someone who is being hurt in an abusive relationship, our advocates can help an advocate find additional resources, a friend understand how best to support a victim-survivor, someone who is abusing their partner talk about change and find help. They are here to help any Native American impacted by domestic violence in whatever way they need. 

 

Who do you help?

StrongHearts is happy to serve anyone impacted by domestic and dating violence but we are specifically culturally appropriate for Native Americans. There are a few other national domestic violence culturally appropriate organizations for other ethnic and racial groups; Casa de Esperanza, Asian Pacific Institute on Gender-Based Violence, Ujima (The National Center for Women in the Black Community). And the National Domestic Violence Hotline’s (1-844-799-7233) services are available 24/7 and built to serve everyone in the United States.

 

Are your advocates Native?

All of our advocates have a strong connection and understanding of Native culture. And yes, they are Native. 

 

Where are you located?

StrongHearts Native Helpline is a national helpline. We established our office in Eagan, Minnesota in March 2019. We serve all Native American impacted by domestic and dating violence nationally. 

 

How do I get enrolled in a tribe? How do I find out if I am Native / what tribe I am affiliated with?

StrongHearts is a domestic violence helpline for Native Americans, so we are not experts on enrollment. A good option is reaching out to the BIA (BIA.gov, (202) 208-3710) or the tribe you are affiliated with.

 

How do I get benefits for being Native?

Unfortunately, getting benefits for being Native is a lasting stereotype about Native Americans. While many tribal nations offer services to their citizens, to access those services, often one has to know what tribe they descend from, be enrolled in that specific tribe and then go through their process. 

If you are affiliated with a tribe, our advocates will discuss tribal services that may be available specifically for domestic and dating violence. StrongHearts Native Helpline can not help with the process of enrollment or ancestry.

What is StrongHearts Native Helpline?

We are a culturally appropriate domestic violence helpline for Native Americans. 

What does that mean?

Culturally appropriate for Native Americans means we are happy to help anyone, but we are built by Natives for Natives. Our advocates are trained specifically to meet the needs of Native American victim-survivors. A domestic violence helpline means our advocates are trained to help anyone impacted by domestic and dating violence. That could be a victim-survivor, a friend, family, or community member. 

Also we are completely free, confidential, and anonymous.

 

What can you do for me?

Our advocates are here to support callers through any part of an abusive relationship. They are highly trained to provide culturally-specific peer support, domestic violence and healthy relationship education, safety planning, and help finding direct services in the caller’s area, and of course, to listen.

Our advocates serve many different /callers. In addition to helping someone who is being hurt in an abusive relationship, our advocates can help an advocate find additional resources, a friend understand how best to support a victim-survivor, someone who is abusing their partner talk about change and find help. They are here to help any Native American impacted by domestic violence in whatever way they need. 

 

Who do you help?

StrongHearts is happy to serve anyone impacted by domestic and dating violence but we are specifically culturally appropriate for Native Americans. There are a few other national domestic violence culturally appropriate organizations for other ethnic and racial groups; Casa de Esperanza, Asian Pacific Institute on Gender-Based Violence, Ujima (The National Center for Women in the Black Community). And the National Domestic Violence Hotline’s (1-844-799-7233) services are available 24/7 and built to serve everyone in the United States.

 

Are your advocates Native?

All of our advocates have a strong connection and understanding of Native culture. And yes, they are Native. 

 

Where are you located?

StrongHearts Native Helpline is a national helpline. We established our office in Eagan, Minnesota in March 2019. We serve all Native American impacted by domestic and dating violence nationally. 

 

How do I get enrolled in a tribe? How do I find out if I am Native / what tribe I am affiliated with?

StrongHearts is a domestic violence helpline for Native Americans, so we are not experts on enrollment. A good option is reaching out to the BIA (BIA.gov, (202) 208-3710) or the tribe you are affiliated with.

 

How do I get benefits for being Native?

Unfortunately, getting benefits for being Native is a lasting stereotype about Native Americans. While many tribal nations offer services to their citizens, to access those services, often one has to know what tribe they descend from, be enrolled in that specific tribe and then go through their process. 

If you are affiliated with a tribe, our advocates will discuss tribal services that may be available specifically for domestic and dating violence. StrongHearts Native Helpline can not help with the process of enrollment or ancestry.

What is StrongHearts Native Helpline?

We are a culturally appropriate domestic violence helpline for Native Americans. 

What does that mean?

Culturally appropriate for Native Americans means we are happy to help anyone, but we are built by Natives for Natives. Our advocates are trained specifically to meet the needs of Native American victim-survivors. A domestic violence helpline means our advocates are trained to help anyone impacted by domestic and dating violence. That could be a victim-survivor, a friend, family, or community member. 

Also we are completely free, confidential, and anonymous.

 

What can you do for me?

Our advocates are here to support callers through any part of an abusive relationship. They are highly trained to provide culturally-specific peer support, domestic violence and healthy relationship education, safety planning, and help finding direct services in the caller’s area, and of course, to listen.

Our advocates serve many different /callers. In addition to helping someone who is being hurt in an abusive relationship, our advocates can help an advocate find additional resources, a friend understand how best to support a victim-survivor, someone who is abusing their partner talk about change and find help. They are here to help any Native American impacted by domestic violence in whatever way they need. 

 

Who do you help?

StrongHearts is happy to serve anyone impacted by domestic and dating violence but we are specifically culturally appropriate for Native Americans. There are a few other national domestic violence culturally appropriate organizations for other ethnic and racial groups; Casa de Esperanza, Asian Pacific Institute on Gender-Based Violence, Ujima (The National Center for Women in the Black Community). And the National Domestic Violence Hotline’s (1-844-799-7233) services are available 24/7 and built to serve everyone in the United States.

 

Are your advocates Native?

All of our advocates have a strong connection and understanding of Native culture. And yes, they are Native. 

 

Where are you located?

StrongHearts Native Helpline is a national helpline. We established our office in Eagan, Minnesota in March 2019. We serve all Native American impacted by domestic and dating violence nationally. 

 

How do I get enrolled in a tribe? How do I find out if I am Native / what tribe I am affiliated with?

StrongHearts is a domestic violence helpline for Native Americans, so we are not experts on enrollment. A good option is reaching out to the BIA (BIA.gov, (202) 208-3710) or the tribe you are affiliated with.

 

How do I get benefits for being Native?

Unfortunately, getting benefits for being Native is a lasting stereotype about Native Americans. While many tribal nations offer services to their citizens, to access those services, often one has to know what tribe they descend from, be enrolled in that specific tribe and then go through their process. 

If you are affiliated with a tribe, our advocates will discuss tribal services that may be available specifically for domestic and dating violence. StrongHearts Native Helpline can not help with the process of enrollment or ancestry.

Our Partners

Image of National Indigenous Women's Resource Center logoNational Indigenous Women’s Resource Center: The National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center, Inc. (NIWRC) is a non-profit organization that is dedicated to restoring the sovereignty of Native nations and safeguarding Native women and their children. The NIWRC supports culturally grounded, grassroots advocacy and provides national leadership to ending gender-based violence in indigenous communities through the development of educational materials and programs, direct technical assistance and the development of local and national policy that builds the capacity of Indigenous communities and strengthens the exercise of tribal sovereignty. | niwrc.org

 

Image of National Domestic Violence Hotline logoThe National Domestic Violence Hotline: The National Domestic Violence Hotline is a nonprofit organization established in 1996 as a component of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA). Operating around the clock, seven days a week, confidential and free of cost, the National Domestic Violence Hotline provides lifesaving tools and immediate support to enable victims to find safety and live lives free of abuse. Callers to The Hotline at 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) can expect highly trained, experienced advocates to offer compassionate support, crisis intervention information and referral services in more than 170 languages. | thehotline.org

 

Image of Family Violence Prevention and Services Program logoThe Family Violence Prevention and Services Program (FVPSA): The Family Violence Prevention and Youth Services Act was signed into law as part of the Child Abuse Amendments of 1984. For over 30 years, FVPSA has served as the primary federal funding stream dedicated to the support of emergency shelter and supportive services for victims of domestic violence and their dependents. It has also provided support in the form of an annual grant to the National Domestic Violence Hotline since 1996, most recently with an earmark in the FY2016 Enacted Appropriations Bill, a portion of which was specifically for developing a tribal hotline. FVPSA is located in the Family Youth Services Bureau (FYSB), a division of the Administration on Children, Youth and Families in the Administration for Children and Families. | learnaboutfvpsa.com

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